Traditional craftsmanship of yesteryear may appear to be a dying art, however we regularly deploy and refine our carpentry services at BS&R. Last year our skills were applied when Christ Church in Warwick needed to replace every shutter on their building in accordance to local historical building guidelines.

Complying with the historical building requirements did not add complication to the design phase, however the guidelines dictate that shutters must be virtually identical to the old ones, minus the wear and tear of course! Fabricating the shutters was simple thanks to the machinery and expertise available to us; however the size of the 8’ x 4’ shutters still required customization and careful installation.

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We replaced the church window shutters with traditional 3” Bermuda slat shutters, a design used in Bermuda for centuries. The major difference between the old and new shutters was the choice of wood type; the new shutters being fabricated using Accoya.

To guarantee the shutters’ extended lifespan we used the “Klima” waterborne paint system to finish the wood. It was chosen mainly because it works well with the Accoya wood materials and guarantees a better cohesion between paint coats.
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We can’t stress it enough. With regards to finishing there are different paint systems available for interior versus exterior millwork. Wood type is a large factor as well but the primary difference depends on a client’s aesthetic preference. It is another component to think about when finishing any outdoor piece, and something we explained in depth to Christ Church.

The most important aspect of the project was ensuring structural integrity while replacing shutters according to the Department of Planning’s strict guidelines for historical building renovations, making this job more than just your usual shutter build.

We’re happy that Christ Church came to us due to our reputation fabricating traditional Bermuda shutters. We love taking on challenges and offering work and services that involve traditional techniques to keep a historic building looking beautiful.

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